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Seminars & Symposiums

27 January: Seminar in Osaka- "China in the Western Balkans" & "The Jury System in Okinawa under the American Occupation "

2018-1-27 (Sat) 10:00 - 13:00

Asia-Pacific Studies Seminar at Osaka University
Date: 27 January 2018 (Saturday)
Venue: Conference Room, 1st floor of Graduate School of Language and Culture Building, Toyonaka Campus, Osaka University
http://www.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/access/toyonaka/toyonaka.html (#1)

Session 1:10:00 – 11:00
Jelena Gledić (Senior Instructor, University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philology)
https://fvm.academia.edu/JelenaGledic
Title: (Im)Possibilities of economic cooperation without political influence: The presence of East Asian countries in the Western Balkans

Session 2: 11:15 – 12:00
Mika Ishida (Graduate Student, Osaka University)
Title: The Jury System in Okinawa under the American Occupation and Its Background of the Introduction



Dear Colleagues:

We will hold an Asia-Pacific Studies Seminar in Osaka on 27 January. If you wish to attend the seminar, please let me know. Seminar papers are available for participants only. Also, domestic travel expense will be provided for those who are willing to serve as commentators.

Contact: Yone Sugita: sugita@lang.osaka-u.ac.jp / yone@sugita.us

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Asia-Pacific Studies Seminar at Osaka University

Date: 27 January 2018 (Saturday)

Venue: Conference Room, 1st floor of Graduate School of Language and Culture Building, Toyonaka Campus, Osaka University

http://www.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/access/toyonaka/toyonaka.html (#1)


Session 1:10:00 – 11:00

Jelena Gledić (Senior Instructor, University of Belgrade – Faculty of Philology)

https://fvm.academia.edu/JelenaGledic


Title: (Im)Possibilities of economic cooperation without political influence: The presence of East Asian countries in the Western Balkans

Abstract: The aim of this paper is to examine the lessons offered from the presence of East Asian countries in the Western Balkans in terms of possibilities to overcome political differences in pursuit of sustainable socio-economic progress. The so-called “Asian Paradox” – a deepening of hostile rhetoric and development of military capacities, coupled with a widening of economic and cultural cooperation between East Asian countries (primarily, China, Japan and South Korea) – has posed questions for the way international relations and development are usually perceived in modern scholarship. Serving as a potential model for preventing unresolved historical tensions from impeding growth, the “Asian Paradox” could be an opportunity to learn and advance for other regions, such as the Western Balkans. Aiming to expand their developing economies from a starting point of turbulent history and recent conflicts, Western Balkan countries struggle with reconciling local, regional and global interests on one hand, and the complex interplay of official policies and unofficial rules that govern society on the other. Through an analysis of the different ways in which China, Japan and South Korea approach countries in this region, as well as the ways both state and non-state actors cooperate within those different frameworks, this paper tries to advance the argument that the seeming “Asian Paradox” could in fact be an opportunity for a new reality of sustainable cooperation among countries and regions and sustainable development worldwide.


Discussants:

Thomas W French (Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University)

http://research-db.ritsumei.ac.jp/Profiles/96/0009508/prof_e.html


Session 2: 11:15 – 12:00

Mika Ishida (Graduate Student, Osaka University)

Title: The Jury System in Okinawa under the American Occupation and Its Background of the Introduction

Abstract:

The jury trials were conducted in Okinawa under the American occupation after World War II, from 1963 through 1972.  There are two accepted opinions about the reason behind the jury system’s introduction into USCAR (the U.S. Civil Administration of the Ryukyu Islands) court.  One takes the U.S. Supreme Court Decision, Kinsella v. Singleton, held in 1960, as a deciding factor; the other, Bennet Ikeda, an American civilian, being found guilty in USCAR court and submitting a writ of habeas corpus to the Federal District court.  Focusing on primary sources, this paper analyzes the deciding element of the jury system establishment to verify the two opinions, in order to investigate the most impactful factor.

It became clear that the Supreme Court Decision was used as a chance to start the discussion regarding the jury system in USCAR.  Ikeda case was, in turn, a tool to compel High Commissioner Caraway to revise the proclamation.  It was the recommendation from inside of the USCAR and the pressure from the outside that invited the substantial changes.

There was a controversy on the introduction of the jury system in Okinawa among USCAR officials.  Russell L. Stevens, a director of Judicial Department, forcefully recommended the institution of jury trials, and Marvin G. Krieger, a director of Legislative and Legal Department, understood its merits and made efforts to improve the legislation.  On the other hand, High commissioner Caraway made strongly objection to the jury system.  Deputy under Secretary Army told Caraway that grand and petit jury proceedings should be started in Ryukyu prior to completion of appellate action in Ikeda case.  Consequently, Caraway conceded to sign the proclamation on March 8, 1963.


Discussants:

Thomas W French (Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University)


Cultural Exchange over Lunch Obento: 12:00-12:45

Date: 2018-1-27 (Sat) 10:00 - 13:00
Venue: 1F Conference Room, Graduate School of Language and Culture
Registration: Registration by email is required for this seminar.
Contact: Sugita Laboratory
sugita@lang.osaka-u.ac.jp

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