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Device and method quickly predicts OPV performance without fabrication

2012-11-12(Mon)

Under the leadership of Assistant professor Akinori SAEKI, a doctor's course student, Saya YOSHIKAWA, and Professor Shu SEKI, all affiliated with Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, and as part of JST's basic research programs, a group of researchers have developed a device and method for quickly predicting performance of organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) without the necessity of making such devices. The group developed a method for evaluating performance of OPV devices with a device that measures microwave conductivity (TRMC) and a white light pulse from a Xe-flash lamp. This evaluation method allowed examination of the OPV active layer without requiring fabrication of the actual device.

The group has also found that the transient photoconductivity directly correlates with the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the OPV device even when different materials and solutions are used for OPVs. Thus, regarding unknown materials, this measurement device offers a facile way to predict photovoltaic performance without device fabrication.
Abstract

"State-of-the-art low band gap conjugated polymers have been investigated for application in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) to achieve efficient conversion of the wide spectrum of sunlight into electricity. A remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been achieved through the use of innovative materials and device structures. However, a reliable technique for the rapid screening of the materials and processes is a prerequisite toward faster development in this area. Here we report the realization of such a versatile evaluation technique for bulk heterojunction OPVs by the combination of time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and submicrosecond white light pulse from a Xe-flash lamp. Xe-flash TRMC allows examination of the OPV active layer without requiring fabrication of the actual device. The transient photoconductivity maxima, involving information on generation efficiency, mobility, and lifetime of charge carriers in four well-known low band gap polymers blended with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), were confirmed to universally correlate with the PCE divided by the open circuit voltage (PCE/Voc), offering a facile way to predict photovoltaic performance without device fabrication."

 

 

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To learn more about this research, please read the full research report entitled "A Versatile Approach to Organic Photovoltaics Evaluation Using White Light Pulse and Microwave Conductivity" at this page of the Journal of the American Chemical Society website.


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